Quantcast

Google’s Legal Chief Leaving Amid Sexual Misconduct Accusations

(Associated Press) David Drummond, the legal chief of Google parent company Alphabet, is leaving at the end of the month, following accusations of inappropriate relationships with employees.

Alphabet did not give a reason for Drummond’s departure in a short regulatory filing Friday.

The company said in November that its board was investigating sexual misconduct cases against executives. Claims against Drummond were included in the investigations.

Thousands of Google employees walked out of work in 2018 to protest the company’s handling of sexual misconduct claims. The board investigation followed lawsuits brought by shareholders after reports of sexual harassment at Google received national attention.

Last August, a former Google employee, Jennifer Blakely, published a report of her relationship with Drummond. Drummond has acknowledged a relationship with Blakely. But in a statement at the time, he said he “never started” a relationship with anyone else at Alphabet.

The company said Drummond is not getting an exit package as part of his departure. His compensation package for 2018 was worth $47 million, making him one of the company’s highest-paid employees, according to regulatory filings.

In a memo sent to employees, Drummond said that with founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin “now leaving their executive roles at Alphabet, the company is entering an exciting new phase, and I believe that it’s also the right time for me to make way for the next generation of leaders.”

He did not mention the misconduct allegations.

Drummond said Page and Brin asked for his help more than 20 years ago when what became Google and Alphabet was just an unincorporated startup. Drummond joined Google full time in 2002 and was named chief legal officer in 2006.

Drummond’s departure comes as Alphabet, like other big tech companies, faces regulatory presures around the world. Last March, Europe’s antitrust regulators ordered it to pay 1.49 billion euros ($1.7 billion) for freezing out rivals in the online advertising business. It also faces antitrust probes in the U.S. as lawmakers question its power and dominance.

TRENDING NOW

S&P 500 Sinks 3.5% as Virus Cases Surge, Election Tightens

(Associated Press) The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 943 points Wednesday as surging coronavirus cases in the U.S. and Europe threaten more...

Road, Logging Restrictions to End in Largest National Forest

(Associated Press) The federal government announced plans Wednesday to lift restrictions on logging and building roads in a pristine rainforest in Alaska...

Zuckerberg Donates $350M to Help Boost Democrat Voter Turnout

(Joshua Paladino) Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, have spent $350 million to boost election turnout in heavily Democratic areas, which prompted...

Arizona Realtor Arrested and Fired from Job After Hurling N-word

(MEAWW) An Arizona Realtor has been arrested after a video of him accosting two young black men outside his condo building with...

‘Who The Hell Elected You?’ Cruz Criticizes Twitter CEO for Censoring

(Daily Caller) Republican Texas Sen. Ted Cruz criticized Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on Wednesday for censoring stories from the New York Post...